Lakes & Rivers
Alaska

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Lakes & Rivers in Alaska



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Alagnak Wild River, Alaska

1000 Silver St., Bldg. 603
King Salmon, AK 99613
Phone: (907) 246-3305
Description: The headwaters of Alagnak Wild River lie within the rugged Aleutian Range of neighboring Katmai National Park and Preserve. Meandering west towards Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea, the Alagnak traverses the beautiful Alaska Peninsula, providing an unparalleled opportunity to experience the unique wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of southwest Alaska.
Website

Alatna Wild River, Alaska

Airport Road
Bettles, AK 99726
Phone: (907) 692-5494
Description: Dedicated a wild and scenic river on December 2, 1980, the Alatna River drains the central Brooks Range. Wildlife, spectacular scenery and interesting geologic features abound along the river corridor. The first twenty-five miles from the headwater lakes are rocky and can be very shallow. During low water a portage of several miles from the Summit Lake may be required and lining boats may be necessary as well.
Website

Aniakchak Wild River, Alaska

1000 Silver St., Bldg. 603
King Salmon, AK 99613
Phone: (907) 246-3305
Description: Given its remote location and challenging weather conditions, Aniakchak is one of the most wild and least visited places in the National Park System. This landscape is a vibrant reminder of Alaska's location in the volcanically active "Ring of Fire," as it is home to an impressive six mile (10 km) wide, 2,500 ft deep caldera formed during a massive volcanic eruption 3,500 years ago.
Website

Charley Wild River, Alaska

There is no direct road access into the Charley River basin.
West end of 1st Avenue
Eagle, AK 99738
Phone: (907) 547-2233
Description: The Charley River originates in the Yukon-Tanana uplands and flows northward about 108 miles to the Yukon River. The river flows through three distinct topographic regions - open upland valley, entrenched river, and open floodplain - offering varied, sometimes spectacular scenery as well as unspoiled wilderness. The upland valleys drain a rugged mountain area where peaks over 6,000 feet are common. The river passes beneath high bluffs and cliffs where the majority of the rapids occur. When the river leaves the high bluff area, it enters the flat plain of the Yukon Valley where it slowly meanders to the Yukon River.
Website

Chilikadrotna Wild River, Alaska

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is located on the Alaska Peninsula southwest of Anchorage and west of Homer.
We are not on the road system
Port Alsworth, AK 99653
Phone: (907) 644-3626
Description: The Chilikadrotna River originates from Chigmit Mountains (a sub-range of the Alaska-Aleutian ranges) at Twin Lakes and flows west through its foothills approximately 9 miles to the border of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve then re-enters the Preserve for 2.6 miles. The river continues an additional 35 miles through state land before joining the Mulchatna River.
Website

John Wild River, Alaska

Within Gates of the Arctic National Park.
North Slope Borough, Yukon–Koyukuk, AK 99754
Phone: n/a
Description: This river flows south from Anaktuvuk Pass in Alaska's Brooks Range. The valley is an important migration route for the Arctic Caribou Herd.
Website

Kobuk Wild River, Alaska

Airport Road
Bettles, AK 99726
Phone: (907) 692-5494
Description: The Kobuk River flows from its headwaters in the Endicott Mountains and Walker Lake, through a broad valley. Located on the southernmost reaches of the Brooks Range, it passes through one of the largest continuous forested areas in the Park and Preserve.
Website

Mulchatna Wild River, Alaska

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve
Port Alsworth, AK 99653
Phone: (907) 644-3626
Description: The Mulchatna River and one of its tributaries, the Chilikadrotna River, are popular Southwest Alaska destinations for floatfishing. Other Mulchatna tributaries, including the Stuyahok and Koktuli rivers, are also popular fishing streams
Website

Noatak Wild River, Alaska

Airport Road
Gates Of The Arctic National Park and Preserve
Bettles, AK 99726
Phone: (907) 692-5494
Description: This river drains the largest mountain ringed river basin in America that is still virtually unaffected by human activities. However, this high-use area is a designated wilderness concern. Vegetation around lakes at the various put-in and take-out points is being destroyed and the impact is detracting from the area's wild character. After arriving, move directly to the river to camp on gravel bars. Use existing trails between lakes and the river. Do not build fires on the tundra.
Website

North Fork of the Koyukuk Wild River, Alaska

Airport Road
Gates Of The Arctic National Park and Preserve
Bettles, AK 99726
Phone: (907) 692-5494
Description: The North Fork of the Koyukuk flows from the south flank on the Arctic Divide through broad, glacially carved valleys in the rugged Endicott Mountains of the Central Brooks Range. It passes between Boreal Mountain and Frigid Crags dubbed the "Gates to the Arctic" by Bob Marshall. The North Fork joins the Middle Fork and can be run all the way to Bettles Field.
Website

Salmon Wild River, Alaska

Kobuk Valley National Park
PO Box 1029
Kotzebue, AK 99752
Phone: (907) 442-3890
Description: he Salmon River flows 70 miles from the limestone cirques of the highest peak in Kobuk Valley National Park, Mt. Angayukaqsraq, to the Kobuk River. The Salmon River supports an excellent grayling fishery and large runs of chum and pink salmon; the river owes its name to the large salmon runs. Over its course, the Salmon River flows through the ecotone where arctic tundra transitions into boreal forest lowlands.
Website

Tinayguk Wild River, Alaska

Gates of the Arctic National Park
Bettles, AK 99726
Phone: (907) 692-5494
Description: Traveling through the park on foot affords opportunities of exploration and discovery. Mountain ridges and passes reveal splendid vistas and can take you to the most remote and least traveled areas of the Park and Preserve.
Website

Tlikakila Wild River, Alaska

Lake Clark National Park
Port Alsworth, AK 99653
Phone: (907) 644-3626
Description: NPS Photograph The Tinayguk is the largest tributary of the North Fork of the Koyukuk. Both lie entirely within the pristine environment of Gates of the Arctic National Park.
Website

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The Colorado River basin supplies water to about 40 million people and 4 million acres of farmland in seven states — California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming — as well as to people and farms in part of Mexico.

How's My Waterway? Find information about local waters.
Learn the condition of local streams, lakes and other waters anywhere in the US... quickly and in plain language. See if your local waterway was checked for pollution, what was found, and what is being done. The source of this information is a US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database of State water quality monitoring reports provided under the Clean Water Act. (website)

American Rivers
1101 14th Street NW, Suite 1400
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-7550
American Rivers is the leading organization working to protect and restore the nation’s rivers and streams. Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Since 1973, American Rivers has fought to preserve these connections, helping protect and restore more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects, and the annual release of America’s Most Endangered Rivers®.
website




Womens Outdoor Life

Website


When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors! The Importance of Lightning Safety

Summer is the peak season for one of the nation's deadliest weather phenomena--lightning. Though lightning strikes peak in summer, people are struck year round. In the United States, an average of 51 people are killed each year by lightning, and hundreds more are severely injured. While lightning fatalities have decreased over the past 30 years, lightning continues to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States.


Myth: If it is not raining, then there is no danger from lightning.

Fact: Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. This is especially true in the western United States where thunderstorms sometimes produce very little rain.


Myth: The rubber soles of shoes or rubber tires on a car will protect you from being struck by lightning.


Fact:: Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. The steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal. Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.


Myth: 'Heat lightning' occurs after very hot summer days and poses no threat.


Fact:: 'Heat lightning' is a term used to describe lightning from a thunderstorm too far away for the thunder to be heard.


Myth: Lightning never strikes the same place twice.


Fact:: Lightning often strikes the same place repeatedly, especially if it's a tall, pointy, isolated object. The Empire State Building is hit nearly 100 times a year.


Myth: If it's not raining or there aren't clouds overhead, you're safe from lightning.


Fact:: Lightning often strikes more than three miles from the center of the thunderstorm, far outside the rain or thunderstorm cloud. 'Bolts from the blue' can strike 10-15 miles from the thunderstorm.


Myth: A lightning victim is electrified. If you touch them, you'll be electrocuted.


Fact:: The human body does not store electricity. It is perfectly safe to touch a lightning victim to give them first aid. This is the most chilling of lightning Myths. Imagine if someone died because people were afraid to give CPR! Call 9-1-1 and begin CPR immediately if the person has stopped breathing. Use an Automatic External Defibrillator if one is available. Contact your local American Red Cross chapter for information on CPR and first aid classes.


Myth: If outside in a thunderstorm, you should seek shelter under a tree to stay dry.


Fact:: Being underneath a tree is the second leading cause of lightning casualties. Better to get wet than fried!


Myth: If you are in a house, you are 100% safe from lightning.


Fact:: A house is a safe place to be during a thunderstorm as long as you avoid anything that conducts electricity. This means staying off corded phones, electrical appliances, wires, TV cables, computers, plumbing, metal doors and windows. Windows are hazardous for two reasons: wind generated during a thunderstorm can blow objects into the window, breaking it and causing glass to shatter and second, in older homes, in rare instances, lightning can come in cracks in the sides of windows.


Myth: If thunderstorms threaten while you are outside playing a game, it is okay to finish it before seeking shelter.


Fact:: Many lightning casualties occur because people do not seek shelter soon enough. No game is worth death or life-long injuries. Seek proper shelter immediately if you hear thunder. Adults are responsible for the safety of children.


Myth: If trapped outside and lightning is about to strike, I should lie flat on the ground.


Fact:: Lying flat increases your chance of being affected by potentially deadly ground current. If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, you keep moving toward a safe shelter.

Source: FEMA



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