State of Georgia

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The 7 Principles
The Seven Principles of "Leave No Trace" provide an easily understood framework of minimum impact practices for anyone visiting the outdoors. Although Leave No Trace has its roots in backcountry settings, the Principles have been adapted so that they can be applied anywhere — from remote wilderness areas, to local parks and even in your own backyard.

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10 Largest Cities in Georgia

Georgia State Facts

  • List of Counties


  • List of Towns


  • Points of Interest


  • Capital: Atlanta


  • Largest city: Atlanta


  • Highest point: Brasstown Bald, 4,784 ft (1458 m)


  • Lowest point: Atlantic Ocean, sea level


  • Admission to Union: January 2, 1788 (4th)

Georgia state seal


Georgia State Information

  • Music in Georgia ranges from folk music to rhythm and blues, rock and roll, country music and hip hop.


  • Girl Scouting in the US began on March 12, 1912 in Savannah, Georgia


  • Georgia's principal airport is Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL)


  • The Tybee Island B-47 crash was an incident on February 5, 1958, in which the United States Air Force lost a 7,600-pound (3,400 kg) Mark 15 nuclear bomb in the waters off Tybee Island near Savannah. Following several unsuccessful searches, the bomb was presumed lost somewhere in Wassaw Sound off the shores of Tybee Island. has never been found


  • Nationally known attractions, amusement parks, animal kingdoms and state parks mean there's something for everyone in Georgia.


  • Stone Mountain Park is Georgia’s most visited attraction, drawing nearly 4 million guests each year


  • Bright lights, beautiful sights, and fantastic nights are the just start of entertainment in Georgia. Whether it is day or night, there is no shortage of places to go and things to do in Georgia.


Georgia Points of Interest

Georgia Points of Interest

Points of Interest of Georgia, Things To Do, Places To Go, People To Meet

Georgia State Counties

159 Counties in Georgia

  1. Appling County


  2. Athens-Clarke County


  3. Atkinson County


  4. Bacon County


  5. Baker County


  6. Baldwin County


  7. Banks County


  8. Barrow County


  9. Bartow County


  10. Ben Hill County


  11. Berrien County


  12. Bibb County


  13. Bleckley County


  14. Brantley County


  15. Brooks County


  16. Bryan County


  17. Bulloch County


  18. Burke County


  19. Butts County


  20. Calhoun County


  21. Camden County


  22. Candler County


  23. Carroll County


  24. Catoosa County


  25. Charlton County


  26. Chatham County


  27. Chattahoochee County


  28. Chattooga County


  29. Cherokee County


  30. Clay County


  31. Clayton County


  32. Clinch County


  33. Cobb County


  34. Coffee County


  35. Colquitt County


  36. Columbia County


  37. Cook County


  38. Coweta County


  39. Crawford County


  40. Crisp County


  41. Dade County


  42. Dawson County


  43. Decatur County


  44. DeKalb County


  45. Dodge County


  46. Dooly County


  47. Dougherty County


  48. Douglas County


  49. Early County


  50. Echols County


  51. Effingham County


  52. Elbert County


  53. Emanuel County


  54. Evans County


  55. Fannin County


  56. Fayette County


  57. Floyd County


  58. Forsyth County


  59. Franklin County


  60. Fulton County


  61. Gilmer County


  62. Glascock County


  63. Glynn County


  64. Gordon County


  65. Grady County


  66. Greene County


  67. Gwinnett County


  68. Habersham County


  69. Hall County


  70. Hancock County


  71. Haralson County


  72. Harris County


  73. Hart County


  74. Heard County


  75. Henry County


  76. Houston County


  77. Irwin County


  78. Jackson County


  79. Jasper County


  80. Jeff Davis County


  81. Jefferson County


  82. Jenkins County


  83. Johnson County


  84. Jones County


  85. Lamar County


  86. Lanier County


  87. Laurens County


  88. Lee County


  89. Liberty County


  90. Lincoln County


  91. Long County


  92. Lowndes County


  93. Lumpkin County


  94. Macon County


  95. Madison County


  96. Marion County


  97. McDuffie County


  98. McIntosh County


  99. Meriwether County


  100. Miller County


  101. Mitchell County


  102. Monroe County


  103. Montgomery County


  104. Morgan County


  105. Murray County


  106. Muscogee County


  107. Newton County


  108. Oconee County


  109. Oglethorpe County


  110. Paulding County


  111. Peach County


  112. Pickens County


  113. Pierce County


  114. Pike County


  115. Polk County


  116. Pulaski County


  117. Putnam County


  118. Quitman County


  119. Rabun County


  120. Randolph County


  121. Richmond County


  122. Rockdale County


  123. Schley County


  124. Screven County


  125. Seminole County


  126. Spalding County


  127. Stephens County


  128. Stewart County


  129. Sumter County


  130. Talbot County


  131. Taliaferro County


  132. Tattnall County


  133. Taylor County


  134. Telfair County


  135. Terrell County


  136. Thomas County


  137. Tift County


  138. Toombs County


  139. Towns County


  140. Treutlen County


  141. Troup County


  142. Turner County


  143. Twiggs County


  144. Union County


  145. Upson County


  146. Walker County


  147. Walton County


  148. Ware County


  149. Warren County


  150. Washington County


  151. Wayne County


  152. Webster County


  153. Wheeler County


  154. White County


  155. Whitfield County


  156. Wilcox County


  157. Wilkes County


  158. Wilkinson County


  159. Worth County



Our Story

Georgia is located in the southeaster region of the United States, and was founded in 1732 making it the final of the original thirteen colonies. The state was named directly after King George II who was the king of Great Britain. Georgia was also documented to be the fourth state which ratified the U.S. Constitution. The state is ranked as the 24th most extensive and ranked 9th in terms of population. Georgia has been nicknamed the “Peach State” and the “Empire State of the South”. The state capital is Atlanta and is also the most populated city within the state


Georgia has Florida bordering its south side, the Atlantic Ocean to its east along with South Carolina, and is bordered on the north by Tennessee and North Carolina. The northern region of Georgia is located in the Blue Ridge Mountains which is a part of the Appalachian Mountains. Georgia is also the most extensive state on the east side of the Mississippi River, and its highest point of elevations sits at 4,784 feet above sea level.


The population of the state has been recorded at roughly 9.8 million spread over its almost 60,000 square miles of land area. It has several major rivers running through it including the Chattahoochee River, Suwannee River, and Savannah River. It is also home to several well known lakes such as Lake Lanier, West Point Lake, Lake Hartwell, and Clarks Hill Lake. The major industries in the state are considered to be timber (pine ), agriculture, and textiles.


The state song is “Georgia on My Mind” and the state motto remains “Wisdom, Justice, and Moderation”. The state bird is the Brown Thrasher while the game bird is the Bobwhite. Other state icons include the state marine mammal which is the Right Whale, the state Possum which is the Pogo Possum, and the state insect which is the Honey Bee. The state fish is the Largemouth Bass, and the current world record largemouth bass is also recorded as being caught in Georgia. The state shell is the Knobbed Whelk, the state flower is the Cherokee Rose, and the state tree is the Live Oak.


Georgia is a big player in the U.S. Economy and is also a great state in terms of tourism. Many people travel to Atlanta for entertainment and to Georgia in general to enjoy the climate in the region. Overall Georgia is widely regarded as one of the big contributors to the U.S. Economy.


Georgia has had five official state capitals: colonial Savannah, which later alternated with Augusta; then for a decade at Louisville; and from 1806 through 1868, including during the American Civil War, at Milledgeville. In 1868, the capital was moved to Atlanta and it became the fifth capital city of the state