Cemeteries
New Jersey

NJ flag




Raising just one child can be a tough job for any parent—which is why this woman is being honored for fostering more than 600 children over the course of five decades. 75-year-old Linda Herring from Johnson County, Iowa has been tirelessly providing food, clothing, love, and medical care to hundreds of foster kids since the 1970s. When Herring first began fostering kids, she was also running a home daycare and working as a night custodian in a local high school. Additionally, she volunteered as a first responder for 50 years of her life, according to CNN. Out of the hundreds of foster kids that Herring has taken under her wing, many of them experienced a range of medical conditions and special needs—but that never deterred Herring.
-https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/


Tap the red

Towns | Counties | Home | Points of Interest


Cemeteries in New Jersey


  • xxxxxxxxxxx

  • xxxxxxxxxxx

  • xxxxxxxxxxx

  • xxxxxxxxxxx



Related Cemeteries News in New Jersey




USA Cemeteries News

What Do The Coins Left On Military Tombstones Mean?

Have you ever been in a cemetery and saw cons laying on a tombstone? There is actually a reason behind it. Read more, so you can know what each coin means, and maybe as you visit a fallen soldier this Memorial Day, you can leave a coin to honor them too.

According to snopes.com these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin: A coin left on a headstone let’s the deceased soldier’s family know that somebody stopped by to pay their respect. Leaving a penny means you visited.

A nickel means that you and the deceased soldier trained at boot camp together. If you served with the soldier, you leave a dime. A quarter is very significant because it means that you were there when that soldier was killed.

So what happens to the coins after Memorial Day? It is collected and the money is used for cemetery maintenance, the cost of burial for soldiers, or the care for indigent soldiers. Supposedly the tradition became popular here in the United States during the Vietnam war. It is believed it was a way to show respect without getting into an uncomfortable political discussion about a war that was very controversial.

In general, however, this tradition can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire. It was a way to give a buddy some spending money for the hereafter.

Source: Mix 106 Radio

Cemetery News

News - Arlington National Cemetery
Website


Lava spares family headstone in Hawaii cemetery
Read more


Cemeteries draw complaints - CBS News
Read more


Cemetery Travel: Adventures in Graveyards Around the World
Read more


Mortuary Science Schools
Website



Towns | Counties | Home | Points of Interest


back to top